Current Students

Academic Resources

Academic Resources

As we approach the 9th week of the semester, it is important to remind you of resources dedicated to helping students, both graduate and undergraduate. Many staff and faculty are ready to help you navigate life’s challenges, which may be affecting your individual experience. This message highlights support services and policies to help you make informed decisions about your individual student experience.

The academic calendar highlights the dates and deadlines for the University which you should be aware of as you make decisions about your individual status. Specifically, keep in mind the following dates:

  • November 2, 2020 – Last day to withdraw from a course without an exception from the academic dean
  • November 20, 2020 – Last day to place courses on or remove courses from Pass/Fail grading (Undergrads only)
  • December 7, 2020 – Last day of fall semester classes

Academic or Faculty Advisor:  A student’s major advisor is a resource in navigating academic challenges. Some academic departments also have program staff that can help you determine next steps academically and connect you to resources.  If you are a graduate student, make sure you discuss all possible options with your advisor. If you aren’t sure who your advisor is, you can find this information in StudentAdmin.

Academic Support Services: Graduate and undergraduate students can seek academic support from the Writing Center and the Academic Achievement Center.  The Writing Center provides online writing assistance to both undergraduate and graduate students.  An overview of support for graduate students is available at this link; undergraduates can view this link to learn about available services. The Academic Achievement Center (AAC) offers an array of academic support services, including coaching, mentoring, and student success workshops. Although many of the offerings are geared toward undergraduate students, graduate students can contact the AAC directly to discuss specific support needs and will be referred to available resources. Undergraduate students may seek support from the Q-Center for classes that have a quantitative component. Specifically, the Q-Center provides direct assistance to students via peer tutoring, review sessions, and the creation of innovative learning tools.

Course Instructors:  Students can speak with their course instructor to discuss options within the course, such as opportunities to make up work or extra time on an assignment, as well as the possibility of an Incomplete grade.  The Graduate and Undergraduate Catalogs provide more information on Incomplete grades for students considering this option.

Dean of Students: Staff in the Dean of Students Office are available to support undergraduate students with academic, personal, and other concerns that impact their student experience. Staff in this office provide support without judgement and can help students as they consider completing current courses, rescheduling final exams, or processing a withdrawal or cancellation for those considering taking a break. Questions for the Dean of Students Office staff can be emailed to dos@uconn.edu or students can make an appointment with an Assistant Dean by visiting the Dean of Students Office website to access our online scheduler.

Graduate Student Affairs Office of The Graduate School:  The Graduate Student Affairs Staff can answer questions about both academic and non-academic resources that are available to graduate students and advisement on strategies for dealing with challenges.  If you are struggling to determine what academic resources are available, you can email gradschool@uconn.edu and a staff member can help connect you to the most appropriate resources. They also administer requests for late course drops and for leaves of absence.  Information about dropping a course after November 2, 2020 can be found on the academic calendar. Graduate students who feel the need to step away from their academic studies temporarily or to withdraw from their program can find more information about taking a leave of absence or voluntary separation at The Graduate School website or by emailing gradseparation@uconn.edu.

Regional Student Services Staff: Undergraduates at the regional campuses needing support of an academic or personal nature should connect with the Student Services staff on their home campus. Regional campus Student Services staff can help students as they consider completing current courses, rescheduling final exams, and processing a withdrawal or cancellation if you are considering taking a break. Visit this website to schedule an appointment with a Regional Student Services staff member.

Student Health and Wellness - Mental Health: SHAW provides mental health services to promote the emotional, relational, and academic potential of all undergraduate and graduate students. SHAW-Mental Health offers:

  • Rapid access screening appointments
  • Emergency/Crisis assessment
  • Individual and group therapy
  • Medication management
  • Mindfulness/Meditation/Yoga workshops
  • Referral and off-campus support services

Storrs students (undergrad or graduate) may access SHAW-MH by calling 860-486-4705 or schedule a screening appointment online.

Regional campus students (undergrad or graduate) seeking mental health resources will find campus specific contact information at this link.

Tutoring: Students in need of tutoring may find help within specific academic programs. Below is a list of tutoring resources students may want to access for potential help.

The UConn Library is available to help students with research assistance.

University Advising: Each school or college as well as each regional campus has an office or center with oversight over advising. These centers/offices serve as a resource to undergraduate students, faculty and staff on a wide range of advising matters, including:

  • Permission to register for excess credit or add or drop a course
  • Requesting a late withdrawal from a course
  • Academic probation, dismissal, and appeals of academic dismissal
  • Requesting a general education substitution

To learn more about Advising resources, visit the University Advising website.

We are here to help. Please reach out to one of the many offices listed and the staff and faculty will try their best to provide support and identify solutions. Questions about this information should be directed to dos@uconn.edu or gradschool@uconn.edu.

 

 

 

UConn PhD candidate, Shreya Kulkarni, awarded Baxter Young Investigator Award

UConn PhD candidate, Shreya Kulkarni, awarded Baxter Young Investigator AwardShreya Kulkarni, PhD candidate of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the School of Pharmacy, has been awarded the Young Investigator Award by Baxter for her research on ‘Reconstitution of high concentration lyophilized protein formulations.’ Shreya was presented with the award at Baxter’s international headquarters in Deerfield, Illinois. Shreya and her advisor, Professor Robin Bogner, presented the research to members of Baxter’s organization and winners of other awards. Reflecting on the award, Shreya stated that “it is a great honor to receive this highly competitive award. None of this would have been possible without the continued support and guidance from my advisor Professor Robin Bogner. Dr. Bogner has been instrumental in motivating me to delve deeper into every research problem. I would also like to thank my thesis committee and our collaborators for the helpful discussions and suggestions on my thesis research. I feel very lucky to be part of the Pharmaceutics program at UConn!”

Please join the Graduate School in congratulating Shreya for her outstanding accomplishments!

PwC Innovation Challenge UConn Winner

Please join The Graduate School in congratulating Mac Montana, winner of the UConn round for this year’s PwC Innovation Challenge. Mac is responding to the following question from the competition and will now continue on to the global competition.

We are living through a fundamental transformation in the way we work; automation and “thinking machines” are replacing human tasks, changing the skills that organisations are looking for in their people. But what will the future look like? PwC has developed four scenarios in their Workforce of the Future study: a Red World where innovation rules; a Blue World where corporate is king; a Green World where companies care, and a Yellow World where humans come first.

Assuming you find yourself on a journey that looks like it ends in a “Green and Yellow Worlds” scenario where Companies Care and Humans Come First, what are the pros and cons for you? what skills will be important for individuals to thrive in this world, and how do you plan on adapting to it?

Sarah McAnulty receives AAUW Fellowship

SarahMcAnulty_WhaleSarah McAnulty of the University of Connecticut’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology has received a American Association of University Women American Dissertation Fellowship. With this award, Sarah will conduct her thesis work on the Hawaiian bobtail squid and its symbiosis with a bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri. Sarah’s work is uncovering how animal immune cells distinguish between their beneficial bacteria and others they encounter. For more information about AAUW Fellowships, please visit: https://www.aauw.org/what-we-do/educational-funding-and-awards/

Marc Reyes receives Fullbright

Marc_ReyesMarc Reyes of the University of Connecticut’s Department of History has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program Award to India from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Reyes will conduct research in Delhi, Mumbai, and Ahmedabad. He will be affiliated with Jawaharlal Nehru University’s School of International Studies. His project, “In the Circle of Great Powers: India, the United States, and the Postcolonial Atomic State, 1947-1974” examines the political and cultural contexts of India’s atomic energy program and U.S. involvement in the development of their nuclear weapons program.